Marlin Rissoles

I made these yummy Asian flavoured rissoles with the seemingly never ending supply of marlin we have from the marlin we caught earlier in the year. For anyone new to the blog that wants to know more about “The Marlin” check out The Marlin

These rissoles were made by accident! They actually came about when, having made a filling for wantons, I found the wanton wrappers had mould on them so I did rissoles instead. Not sure how that occurred since the packet was unopened and in date until March 2015…? anyway the wonton wrappers were thrown in the bin and I cooked the filling as rissoles.

The rissoles were simple and tasty..

I blended marlin, ginger and garlic and fish sauce. Then I added finely chopped dried shitake mushroom (soaked in boiling water) and finely shredded cabbage.

I shaped the marlin mix into rissoles and shallow fried them in a fry pan.

cooking marlin rissoles in a fry pan.

I served them with sweet chilli sauce but in the end we decided they were delicious without the sauce and served with a simple salad. They were really tasty. Bon appetite!

To end product. Marlin Rissoles delicious.

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Beer Battered Marlin Fingers and Oysters

On our first day in Island Head Creek QLD, we discovered some huge oysters. Dwayne thought all his Christmases had come at once and like a little boy eager to try out his new truck he just had to go oyster harvesting!

Huge oysters we collected from the rocks.

Later that day, tucked away in Island Head Creek on a rainy day with nothing better to do, I decided to do some cooking. Once I had my Beef Cheek Pie Filling on the simmer and a piece of marlin curing in a gin mix, I decided I’d do some beer battered marlin and oysters for lunch. Yummo!

Beer Battered Marlin Fingers and Oysters QLD

I made a simple beer batter with plain flour and beer. Cleaned the oysters and cut two marlin fillets into thick fingers. Coated the fish and oysters with the batter and deep fried for a few minutes.

Dwayne eating a feast of beer battered marlin and huge oyster we got off the rocks!

I served the beer battered marlin and oysters with several dipping sauces. Sweet chilli, soy, kecap manis, cocktail sauce and a sauce of mayo, lime and capers. Delicious!

Dwayne’s Pasta with Creamy Tuna and Caper Sauce

This is another meal we made using the tuna caught on our sail from Cape Jaffa to Rivoli Bay in South Australia’s south east. In fact Dwayne cooked this and the accolades are all his, however there was a small group effort involve due to the circumstances.

Blue fish tuna caught of South Australia coast
Katrina and Dwayne with the catch of the day!

The day after catching this very delicious little fishie, we were motor-sailing to Port MacDonnell. There was not a breath of wind but the swell was four metres. The swell makes me feel very ill so I was sitting up on the cabin top in the fresh air, with Katrina who was on this trip with us (Katrina also felt sick in the cabin at this stage).

Dwayne decide he wanted tuna pasta for lunch so he asked me what he should do. So as I sat on the cabin top making suggestions as to what he should put in it, Katrina sat in the cockpit chopping the veggies and Dwayne was in the galley cooking up an awesome warm savoury meal which is just what Katrina and I needed!

Dwayne made his creamy tuna sauce with garlic, onion, white wine, chilli, zucchini, capers, lime juice and cream. The end product was delicious!

Pasta made with fresh tuna caught in South Australia

Marlin Pies

Marlin, marlin, marlin! We are still eating marlin regularly and surprisingly I am not running out of interesting ways to cook it. I have a few more ideas to try out yet, but this pie is another one of my favourites. Marlin is a firm fish and it gave this pie a real meatiness.

Delicious marlin filled pie with puff pastry

Here is what I did… 

I sautéed one finely diced carrot, one stick of celery finely diced, one onion finely diced and one rasher of bacon diced. Once the veggies started to soften I added one cup of fish stock*and further cooked the veggies as I simmered the fish stock to reduce it by half.

Then I added 200ml of cream (longlife which I always have on the boat) and the cubed marlin. Stirred to combine all the ingredients and then pour it into two deep ramekins.

Delicious marlin filled pie with puff pastry

I topped the ramekins with pastry and popped them in the oven.

Delicious marlin filled pie with puff pastry

The marlin does not take long to cook, so as soon as the pastry was puffed and browned I served the pies.  They were really, really yummy!

Marlin pies ready to east. Delicious marlin filled pie with puff pastry

 

*Note: I used fish stock cubes that I picked up at an Asian grocer, Ikan Bilis, the brand is Knorr. They are very strong and worked perfectly with this pie.

Marlin Dumplings in a Spicy Broth

At the moment we are still working our way through the marlin we caught out from South West Rocks, NSW.

photo 3

I’m having a lot of fun thinking up new ways to serve Marlin, and  these marlin dumplings are one of my favourite creations so far and very easy to make.

This is what I did…

In a food processor I blended marlin with some fresh ginger, fish sauce and spring onions, then I mixed in some chives. I made the dumplings using wanton wrappers.

Wonton wrapped dumpling made with marlin

For the broth I use chicken stock, five spice, chilli, and some slices of fresh ginger. I brought the broth to the boil then reduced the heat and simmered for a few minutes.

Simmer the dumplings

I simmered the dumplings in the broth for 3-4 minutes, then they were ready to serve!

Marlin Dumplings in Star Anise Broth

Bon Appetit!

Like this simple meal? Please pin and share with family and friends… thank you!

Chinese style dumpling or wantons made with marlin in a spicy broth

BBQ Tuna Steaks on a Sprout and Carrot Salad with an Orange Mustard Dressing.

More often than not, I cook dinner with only the ingredients on board i.e. no trip to the shop to get lettuce or tomato. If I want to make a salad it will often consist of tinned beans or quinoa and any vegetable I may have on board. Our fridge is not very big so I cannot often get veggies that take up a lot of space such lettuce, or veggies that damage easily. I do however sprout my own beans and seeds.

On this particular day in Broken Bay we were tucked away in Jerusalem Bay enjoying the seclusion when I had a hankering for a fresh salad with my dinner.

A search through my fridge revealed a carrot, half a zucchini, finger limes and a container of freshly sprouted mung beans. We also had oranges and some mustard seeds sprouting which were ready to use.

So here is what I did.

I made a salad with grated carrot and zucchini. Added peeled and chopped orange, mung beans, mustard sprouts and the pulp from one finger lime.

The little pink balls on top of the salad are the finger lime pulp.
The little pink balls on top of the salad are the finger lime pulp.

I served my salad topped with barbequed blue fin tuna (caught in South Australia) and finished it with a drizzle of dressing made with orange juice, Dijon mustard and olive oil. Garnished with more finger lime. Yum!

Tuna steak with salad and mustard

Note: Finger Lime is a delicate rainforest tree that naturally occurs as an understorey tree in SE Queensland and Northern NSW.

Pickled Octopus

We put the crab pot out to try and catch crabs while moored in Fame Cove, Port Stephens NSW. No luck with crabs but we didn’t go away empty handed, we did get an octopus.

Pickled Octopus
Octopus caught in the crab trap.

One of our favourite happy hour nibbles is pickled octopus, so we set to work making it.

Dwayne’s first job is to get it out of the net; I just can’t handle the thought of it wrapping it’s tentacles around my arms (which it does!).

The Octopus

octopus
Octopus

Dwayne prepares it by removing it’s head and the skin , then cutting it into individual tentacles.

Removing the octopus skin.
Removing the octopus skin.

I place the tentacles into a pot and put it on the lowest possible heat (adding no water). I simmer the octopus for about 30 minutes. The pot fills with liquid as the octopus simmers.

Pickled octopus

When cooked I slice the octopus into bite-size pieces and place them in a container with one part white vinegar, one part sweet spiced vinegar, half a packet of pickling spice mix, a pinch of chilli flakes and a slice onion. Then refrigerate it!

Pickle octopus ready to refrigerate.
Pickle octopus ready to refrigerate.

When I serve the octopus I place it in a serving dish and drizzle it with a little olive oil, yum.

Pickled Octopus
Pickled Octopus ready to serve.

Check out our Pickled Octopus Salad with Lime Aioli

 

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