Marlin Dumplings in a Spicy Broth

At the moment we are still working our way through the marlin we caught out from South West Rocks, NSW.

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I’m having a lot of fun thinking up new ways to serve Marlin, and  these marlin dumplings are one of my favourite creations so far and very easy to make.

This is what I did…

In a food processor I blended marlin with some fresh ginger, fish sauce and spring onions, then I mixed in some chives. I made the dumplings using wanton wrappers.

Wonton wrapped dumpling made with marlin

For the broth I use chicken stock, five spice, chilli, and some slices of fresh ginger. I brought the broth to the boil then reduced the heat and simmered for a few minutes.

Simmer the dumplings

I simmered the dumplings in the broth for 3-4 minutes, then they were ready to serve!

Marlin Dumplings in Star Anise Broth

Bon Appetit!

Like this simple meal? Please pin and share with family and friends… thank you!

Chinese style dumpling or wantons made with marlin in a spicy broth

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BBQ Tuna Steaks on a Sprout and Carrot Salad with an Orange Mustard Dressing.

More often than not, I cook dinner with only the ingredients on board i.e. no trip to the shop to get lettuce or tomato. If I want to make a salad it will often consist of tinned beans or quinoa and any vegetable I may have on board. Our fridge is not very big so I cannot often get veggies that take up a lot of space such lettuce, or veggies that damage easily. I do however sprout my own beans and seeds.

On this particular day in Broken Bay we were tucked away in Jerusalem Bay enjoying the seclusion when I had a hankering for a fresh salad with my dinner.

A search through my fridge revealed a carrot, half a zucchini, finger limes and a container of freshly sprouted mung beans. We also had oranges and some mustard seeds sprouting which were ready to use.

So here is what I did.

I made a salad with grated carrot and zucchini. Added peeled and chopped orange, mung beans, mustard sprouts and the pulp from one finger lime.

The little pink balls on top of the salad are the finger lime pulp.
The little pink balls on top of the salad are the finger lime pulp.

I served my salad topped with barbequed blue fin tuna (caught in South Australia) and finished it with a drizzle of dressing made with orange juice, Dijon mustard and olive oil. Garnished with more finger lime. Yum!

Tuna steak with salad and mustard

Note: Finger Lime is a delicate rainforest tree that naturally occurs as an understorey tree in SE Queensland and Northern NSW.

Pickled Octopus

We put the crab pot out to try and catch crabs while moored in Fame Cove, Port Stephens NSW. No luck with crabs but we didn’t go away empty handed, we did get an octopus.

Pickled Octopus
Octopus caught in the crab trap.

One of our favourite happy hour nibbles is pickled octopus, so we set to work making it.

Dwayne’s first job is to get it out of the net; I just can’t handle the thought of it wrapping it’s tentacles around my arms (which it does!).

The Octopus

octopus
Octopus

Dwayne prepares it by removing it’s head and the skin , then cutting it into individual tentacles.

Removing the octopus skin.
Removing the octopus skin.

I place the tentacles into a pot and put it on the lowest possible heat (adding no water). I simmer the octopus for about 30 minutes. The pot fills with liquid as the octopus simmers.

Pickled octopus

When cooked I slice the octopus into bite-size pieces and place them in a container with one part white vinegar, one part sweet spiced vinegar, half a packet of pickling spice mix, a pinch of chilli flakes and a slice onion. Then refrigerate it!

Pickle octopus ready to refrigerate.
Pickle octopus ready to refrigerate.

When I serve the octopus I place it in a serving dish and drizzle it with a little olive oil, yum.

Pickled Octopus
Pickled Octopus ready to serve.

Check out our Pickled Octopus Salad with Lime Aioli

 

Pickled Marlin (Numus)

Sailing between Port Stephens and Coffs Harbour in NSW we caught a blue marlin. It was amazing! After two hours of reeling him in and letting him run, the game finally ended with us the victors and a freezer full of marlin. Read about The Marlin!

Dwayne's Marlin
We have 55 bags of frozen marlin steaks, around ten bags of belly flaps and other off cuts to use in currys, pies etc and with the last of the meat that we got off the marlin (the scraps on the bones) I made pickled marlin.

Pickled Marlin

I boiled white vinegar, brown sugar, mustard, fennel and coriander seeds, peppercorns, garam masala and chilli. I added sliced onion to the vinegar mix after I had taken it off the heat. I then set the vinegar and onions aside for about 1 hour until the mix had cooled. The final step was to simply add the marlin. Viola! Pickled marlin.

Spices, vinegar and raw marlin

Ready to eat pickled marlin
Pickled marlin ready to eat.

Marlin Numus

For this pickled fish, I simply mixed white vinegar, soy, lime juice, chilli, garlic and brown sugar. I then layered the marlin and sliced onion in a container and poured the vinegar mix over it. Done and very delicious if I do say so myself!

Pickled marlin with chilli

Delicious pickled marlin with chilli.
Marlin Numus ready to eat.

Tempura Oysters

Tempura Oysters are my favourite. Even more so when we have plucked the oyster fresh from the rocks ourselves! While in Broken Bay, North of Sydney NSW we had the opportunity to treat ourselves to fresh oysters a few times.

This particular day I decided to do tempura oysters three ways; dressed with soy & mirin, wasabi mayo and chilli ginger mirin.

Collecting oysters from the rocks

My tempura oysters with three different dressings.

 I made a simple tempura batter with plain flour, powdered egg and soda water. Deep fried the battered oyster for one to two minutes and then dress them with the sauce. Simple, easy and delicious!

Yummy tempura oysters

Thai Style Fish Cakes and Battered Fish Bits

At an anchorage called “Hole in the Wall” at Jervis Bay, we could catch nothing but these voracious little leatherjackets which kept devouring our bait, hooks, sinkers and squid jags. In the end we decided to eat them!

Razor sharp teeth of the leatherjackets!
Razor sharp teeth of the leatherjackets!

Firstly for lunch I made Thai Style Fish Cakes by blending up the fish with garlic, onion, red curry paste, left-over tin corn and a little corn flour. The result was yummy and I served them with soy and sweet chilli sauce.

Thai Style Fish Cakes
For dinner I made a batter and deep-fried the small fish fillets.

Battered Leatherjacket

Tuna Sushi and Sashimi

The first tuna we caught was a Blue Fin Tuna which we caught trolling on our trip from Cape Jaffa to Rivoli Bay in South Australia.

Blue Fin tuna fish caught on SV Thorfinn whilst sailing to Victoria from Adelaide

Once we were anchored in Rivoli Bay, Dwayne cleaned the tuna while I cooked up some sushi rice.

A plate of tuna dishes made with a blue fin tuna caught of the South Australian coast BBQ tuna, sashimi, sushi and ceviche.
BBQ tuna, sashimi, sushi and ceviche

We enjoyed a platter of sushi (raw tuna, pickled ginger and wasabi), sashimi, ceviche (cooked by lemon juice) and grilled tuna, served with a dipping sauce of mirin and soy and some wasabi.

 

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